Harry Sidebottom

Q&A with Harry

Which writers have inspired you?

Lots of different writers at different times. When I was a child I read a lot of adventure stories: John Buchan, Hammond Innes, Alistair MacLean. In my early teens I thought Tolkein the greatest writer ever. By the time I was at University I was into on the one hand what is often rather dismissively referred to as the English comic novel, Evelyn Waugh, Anthony Powell, Kingsley Amis, and on the other the nineteenth century Russians. It probably says something about my limitations that I still prefer the early Russian writers, Pushkin and Lermontov to the later masters. Among contemporary novelists, I always get the new Julian Barnes and William Boyd as soon as they are published. For historical novels, I grew up reading Alfred Duggan, Graham Shelby, and Mary Renault. Patrick O’Brian remains an inspiration. Recently I have discovered Cormac McCarthy; wonderful, a literary novelist who does not avoid action.

How and where do you write?

It is no good poncing about waiting for inspiration to strike. I work in my study, nine to five, six days a week; more if a deadline is near. I carry a notebook, to get descriptions of stuff I see and hear fixed before I forget it, and to jot down lines from books and newspapers.

How does writing fiction compare with writing non-fiction?

They are not as different as people tend to think. Writing history or historical fiction – for either you choose what research to do, which bits you will use, how you arrange and nuance them. Doing both helps. In scholarly research I often come across things that will be useful for the novels, and writing fiction makes me learn about new areas of the classical world.

What drew you to this period in history?

The third century AD was a period of fast change, with lots of political and military activity. I had done research on it before. The sources are particularly interesting. That little is known for certain, adds a level of freedom.

Why do you think Ancient Rome remains so popular?

I can think of a couple of pretentious possible reasons. A world where there was one remaining superpower which ‘policed’ the world, and where there was conflict between east and west, might resonate in the twenty first century. Or maybe it is just Gladiator was a great movie.

Do you believe that people should be able to learn from historical novels?

I adored Patrick O’Brian’s Jack Aubrey/Stephen Maturin novels. When I read a straight history on the subject, N.A.M. Roger’s wonderful The Wooden World: Anatomy of the Georgian Navy, I found I already knew a great deal from O’Brian’s fiction. If a historical novel neither teaches you anything nor raises interesting questions, most likely it is not worth reading.

What liberties do you have to take with the history for the benefit of the action?

The surface level stories of Ballista and his familia are invented – the very little we half know about the historical Ballista is in Lion of the Sun – but the background is as true as I can make it. Not just the externals – the clothes, food, weapons and the like – but the internal lives of the characters – their attitudes and values. One thing I did change in Fire in the East was the name and lay out of Dura-Europos; the topography and archaeology of the town was too complicated to fit easily into a novel. Where I change things, I let the reader know in the Historical Afterword.

Your characters are so vividly drawn – is character development harder in historical novels? Or is it more important?

I don’t see a difference. I am impatient with the artificial boundaries of ‘genre’ and ‘literary’ fiction. As, I think, John Banville said, there is just good writing and bad writing.

Do you have any favourite historical film/TV adaptations?

Probably my favourite historical film is Wolfgang Petersen’s Das Boot. The reason is oddly specific. I remember watching the original series on TV. It was Sunday evenings. We had dinner early, so I could watch it with my father. He is dead now. Thinking back to it, I seem absurdly young for my years then. I also often re-watch Ran, Kurosawa’s Samurai re-imagining of King Lear, and Cyrano de Bergerac with Gerard Depardieu. My favourite TV show was The Sopranos until I saw The Wire – the nearest ever thing to a novel on screen. Just like I do not read many novels set in the classical world, I do not watch many films with that setting. But, that said, Gladiator was marvellous.

What advice would you give aspiring writers?

Write a lot, different types of thing, only show the stuff you are very happy with and have been so for some time, do not pastiche, find your own voice, get an agent. Obvious stuff.

63 Responses to “Q&A with Harry”

  1. jean benton (nee Bowie)

    ‘Iron and Rust’ is dedicated to Ewen Bowie.
    Bowie is an unusual surname and it is the surname with which I was born.
    I have done a some research into my family history and wondered if we are in any way connected.

    My grandfather, Joseph Bowie, was a trawlerman in Buckie, Banffshire, Scotland before moving to Grimsby, Lincolnshre (as it was then) between the wars,
    My father, Felix Bowie, was born there, as was I in 1945.

    I am curious to find if we have is any connection.

    I apologise for any unwarranted or unwanted intrusion.

    Jean Benton

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Dear Jean,

      Thank you for your note. Ewen Bowie was the supervisor of my doctoral thesis at Oxford, and is now a very good friend. He is from Scotland, so you may be related to this very eminent classical scholar. My only link to Scotland is a grandmother – a Dixon – born in the Borders.

      Hope you enjoy Iron & Rust.

      Best wishes

      Harry Sidebottom

      Reply
  2. Philip H. Foster

    Dear Sir,
    This is just FYI, “salve” citizen, for your Roman side.

    Please go to purcelithia.info and view the Venetian Phalerae: a newly identified collection of three, perfectly intact, ancient Roman military phalerae; these slated for XRF dating in July at the Getty Villa under the auspices of Dr. D. A. Scott, an archeological metallurgist and professor of art history at UCLA, who is also affiliated with the Getty Museum.

    It would seem that these are no random collection of like objects, rather, an assemblage of souvenirs spanning some 400 years, representing the 9th under Caesar, the 17th as commanded by Varus, and the 11th under Dioclecian– possibly constituting nothing less than an assemblage representing all three of the major military defeats of the Roman Army at the hands of the Celts.

    Any feedback from such learned individuals as yourself would be invaluable.

    I’ve always been a “finder,” but seem to have outdone myself this time.

    Sincerely,
    Philip H. Foster
    AKA: Lives Too Long
    Director, Purcelithia.org
    Discoverer of the Venetian Phalerae

    Reply
  3. nev kelly

    is there a seventh warrior of rome book coming. if so when will it be published. thank you nev kelly

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Dear Nev,

      Thanks for the inquiry.

      Indeed there will be a seventh Warrior novel (working title “The Lords of Atlas”). In fact the next trilogy (the third) is sketched out (working titles of the other two are “The Sons of Aetna” and “The Guardians of Virtue”). They will not be out for a bit, as volumes two and three of Throne of the Caesars will be published in 2015 and 2016.

      Best wishes

      Harry Sidebottom

      Reply
      • Paul Campbell

        Dear Harry,
        So pleased you are continuing the riveting Warrior of Rome series.
        Cant wait for the next one !
        Thank you for entertaining and educating me – love the maps too !

        Best Wishes

        Paul

        Reply
        • Mike Jones

          Hi Mr Sidebottom

          As above I am excited to hear the adventures for Ballista and his Familia will continue.
          I don’t read Much as I get bored easy but your books got me hooked and the audio book versions have kept my historical fascinations alive and I get really excited when I recognise places because of your books. (I also enjoy the books)
          Do you have any dates for the next trilogy?
          Keep up the good work.
          Kind Regards
          Mike,

          (All the way from Wales)

          Reply
          • Harry Sidebottom

            Hi Mike,
            Very pleased to hear that you enjoy the books!
            The next Ballista novel is “The Last Hour”. It will be out 8th March 2018, but is already available to pre-order, with a discount, on Amazon. It is my first novel actually set in the city of Rome, and is a race against time thriller.
            After that will come “Falling Sky”, a cavalry column cut off behind enemy lines in Gaul.
            Third probably will be set in Sicily.
            Very best wishes
            Harry
            PS The actor Nick bolton does a good job with the audio books!

      • LizMann

        Dear Harry

        I was so imprssed by the Warriors of Rome series and really look forward to the follow up books. I am even starting to learn Latin!
        Could you please tell me when to expect these as you mentioned some time ago to another reader/

        Reply
  4. Rob McCullough

    Dear Harry,

    The depth of detail in your novels is spectacular. Have you ever worked as an advisor to film and/or television show? Any chance we’ll see a film or television adaptation of Warrior of Rome series? I have the popcorn ready.

    Take care,
    Rob

    P.S. You broke my heart at the end of Wolves of the North.

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Dear Rob,

      I did several seasons on `Ancient Discoveries`. Used to be repeated on the History Channel all the time – drove my wife mad.

      A film would be heaven.

      Best wishes

      Harry

      PS Was aiming for that effect with end of Wolves.

      Reply
  5. Andrew De Groot

    A film adaption of Fire In The East would be awesome. I think someone should send the book to Ridley Scott and say, “Hey, man. Make a film out of this!”

    I can just see the ballistae twang-slide-thumping to-and-fro. exotic Eastern beauties seducing (or trying to seduce) main cast members and the tunnel battles with choking and dying soldiers. All of this against a backdrop of sand dunes. If the costume design crew could get the third century look right, it would be spectacular indeed!

    Reply
  6. Gary Owens

    As a frequent visitor to Italy to view as much Roman history as I can manage I can only praise the authenticity and atmosphere of the warrior series. I am glad that we have not seen the end of Ballista but I am looking forward to a new trilogy. I spotted Diocles in the last book ,the future Diocletian. I wonder if Ballista will survive long enough to reach the “Tetrarchy”. Hope so

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Dear Gary,

      Very glad you enjoy the novels.

      Think Ballista might make it into the Tetrarchy, or maybe his sons?

      Best wishes

      Harry

      Reply
      • Gary Owens

        I have just finished your amazing second book of the Iron and Rust trilogy “Blood and Steel”. I just can’t praise the story telling enough – how do you manage to weave so many diverse characters into one narrative? I am totally intrigued with this period of Roman History and how different factions could raise support or otherwise for different imperial claims .I was lucky enough to be in Rome for the “birthday ” celebrations of Augustus and was present at the Forum of Augustus for the incredible presentation held there so it reverberates well with me when these monumental buildings are still in use some 200 years later in your book.Even in the time of Iron and Rust there was still a lot of marble about and in use!
        Looking forward to book three!

        Best Wishes Gary

        Reply
  7. Barbara

    Hi! just saw that “Ballista” will live again…..looking forward to this ! Is there a publication date? The books take much longer to arrive in the Australian bookstores, I always pre-order. Barbara

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Dear Barbara,

      Ballista will get his own novels again. In the meanwhile he pops up in the first two novels in Throne of the Caesars, and has a big role in the third, Fire&Sword.

      Very pleased you enjoy the books.

      Best wishes

      Harry

      Reply
  8. Robert Hamilton

    I recently dashed into a charity shop in Glasgow to request small change for the parking meter outside. I bought “Warrior of Rome” and threw it in the corner when I got home. A few weeks later I started to read it and couldn’t stop until I had finished it. Thought it was fantastic and look forward to reading more about Ballista and co.

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Robert,
      Very glad you enjoyed the book.
      Best wishes
      Harry

      Reply
  9. David Marcus Rose

    Salve Harry,
    Very pleased to hear that Marcus Clodius Ballista will return as I need to see Hippothous brought to account (iudicium?) for his treachery. I’ve just finished reading your ‘very short introduction’ to Ancient Warfare and a most informative read it was too! I’ve always loved reading the stories, both fact and fiction of this period ever since my initial introduction via Rosemary Sutcliff’s The Lantern Bearers. I happen to live just outside Colchester’s Roman walls and see Roman history everyday here, and it’s breath-taking. Keep up the good work!

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Marcus,

      Hippothous has a big role to play in a forthcoming Warrior novel.

      Thanks for kind words about the history book.

      Best wishes

      Harry

      Reply
  10. Gary Owens

    Just finished the first volume of Throne of the Caesars. The narrative is compulsive and so detailed about a period of Roman history with so little in the way of Primary sources. Totally hooked and can’t wait for the next instalment. Many years ago I visited El Djem(Thysdrus) The amphitheatre is still impressive but I was sadly unaware then of its significance during the time of the ” Six Emperors”

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Gary,
      Very glad you made the transition from warrior to Throne. Next one – Blood&Steel – out 21st May.

      Some archaeologists think amphitheatre at Thysrdus was started by Gordian I, others not so sure. But it had to go into the novel.

      Very best

      Harry

      Reply
  11. Marijke Tucker

    Dear Mr Sidebottom,
    I never enjoyed history at school – too many dates and too dry – but I have been hooked by your Warrior of Rome series. Having been to Ephisus recently I could visualise the earthquake and subsequent fight very clearly; and my ears pricked up at the mention on the news of Palmyra being threatened with destruction. I’d never even heard of it before, so thank you for improving my education.
    It’s a cheek to ask, I know, but would you consider adding a pronunciation guide to the glossary at the back of your books?
    All the best.

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Dear Marijke,
      Thank you for your message. It is wonderful to hear that you enjoy the novels.
      Not sure my publisher would approve of adding a pronunciation guide. There is quite a lot of end matter already. And I think it is okay to pronounce the names however seems good to you!
      Very best wishes,
      Harry

      Reply
  12. Jarrett Hagans

    I have all six of your “Warrior of Rome” books, and the audio books. Keep up the fantastic work!

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Jarrett,
      That is great to hear. Messages like yours really do encourage a writer.
      Will do my very best to keep up the good work.
      Best wishes,
      Harry

      Reply
  13. Anthony Aristar

    Glad to hear that Ballista will re-appear. Oddly enough, I’m champing at the bit to see what’s going to happen between him and his (now estranged) wife. That’s a loose end that needs tying off!

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Anthony,
      Very pleased to hear that you are looking forward to his return.
      You are right, we need to know what happens between Ballista and Julia.
      Best wishes,
      Harry

      Reply
  14. Jonathan

    Dr. Sidebottom:

    My father and I really love your books and we purchase both the ebook and audio editions of each. When will your readers in the U.S. be able to purchase Blood & Steel?

    Thanks so much for the many hours of enjoyment you have given us.

    Regards,

    Jonathan

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Dear Jonathan,
      I am delighted that you and your father enjoy the novels.
      The availability of Blood & Steel is in the hands of my publishers.
      Very best wishes,
      Harry

      Reply
  15. Bruce DaCosta

    Harry,

    I have been reading about the Roman Empire; Rise & Fall, The Twelve Casears, Four Reasonable Men, etc. To be sure I am a novice. When reading the Amber Road:
    1) The style of living and tactics in battle scenes; how much historical evidence is available for these topic?
    2) The roman titles; are these close to their roles during the period covered in the books?
    3) Is it possible to find period maps with the same names of the city you have in the book? I am thinkin of Obie, for example?

    Thanks for you time…
    Bruce

    Which of your non-historical work would you recommend for a newbie…

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Dear Bruce,
      I am always especially pleased when the novels raise questions in the minds of readers.
      1) Evidence for style of living and tactics in the north in the third century AD is a mixture of archaeology (of which there is a lot of contemporary Scandinavian material) and earlier (Tacitus) and later (Beowulf and Norse Sagas) literature.
      2) The Roman titles are as accurate for the time as I can make them.
      3) Olbia is quite well known archaeologically, and it should be possible to find a good plan on the internet.
      When you say my non-historical work, are you thinking of the historical fiction or the straightforward history? I ask because so far I have not published any completely non-historical stuff.
      Very best wishes,
      Harry

      Reply
  16. Bob Person

    Harry, have you ever thought of writing a book or books on Marius, his military reforms set Rome on the path from Republic to Empire. His nephew Julius Caesar finished the transition, but without Marius who knows, no one before him was Consul 7 times!

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Dear Bob,
      Marius was incredibly important in the transition from Republic to Principate, as you say.
      Think there have been quite a few novels on him, and I try to keep away from well trodden paths.
      Best wishes,
      Harry

      Reply
  17. Ben Evans

    Dear Dr. Sidebottom,

    I’m currently working on a series of historical novels, focusing on the 1960s race to the Moon and the Apollo lunar landings. I picked up “Fire in the East” whilst on holiday, read it cover to cover, and have since purchased the sequels in the initial series to read. My own novels will obviously focus on characters such as Armstrong, Aldrin etc and I would be interested to know how you went about planning the characters and background stories of Ballista, Maximus, Calgacus, Acilius Glabrio etc, as they all seem very believable.

    Many thanks for your time.

    Best wishes,

    Ben Evans

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Dear Ben,
      All the best with your series of historical novels. You have picked a great topic.
      I think it is always a good idea to work out as detailed a backstory as possible for the main characters. I decided to make Ballista and most of my central characters non-Roman in origin, because outsiders comment more naturally on what is around them. Of course, unlike you, I had an almost totally free hand: Ballista is historical, but the handful of things we know about him are all in Lion of the Sun; Maximus and Calgacus are fictional; and Acilius Glabrio is a fictional character grafted onto a real family.
      Hope that helps a bit.
      Very best wishes,
      Harry

      Reply
  18. Ray Jackson

    Dr Harry
    Bloody hell!
    I just finished all the books on Ballista-6 novels ( today,in fact )
    The story is not completed. You have left me up in the air. There are still many questions to be answered. ( what happens to his wife and kids,Calgacus’s murderer, and even Ballister’s horse !) Yes! I have told my wife that French movies leave the viewer to complete the story. She is Filipino . She must have happy complete music at the end of her American movies. I guess that it is having an influence on me.
    What happens after “The Amber Road” ?
    I am getting old and grumpie.
    Will I get another novel to read before I die ?
    One of the writers ( above) states that there is another “Ballista” follow-up book ,but I can’t find anything.
    Another writer suggests that you write about Marius. He should read the complete series by fellow aussie “Colleen McCullough ”
    Your sincerely
    Ray Jackson (sorry, I am not a writer,in fact I can barely read ! )

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Hi Ray,
      Ballista`s story continues in “The Last Hour”, to be published in March 2018.
      Best
      Harry

      Reply
  19. Jeb Frazer

    Dear Dr Sidebottom,

    Like many, if not all your readers, I wanted to thank you for the hours of joy you have brought with your books. By far the best series I have read in (sadly) too many years of reading. I was overjoyed to read in these questions that you are looking to continue the WOR series and look forward to them as much as anything and everything you have written.
    I wonder, as most of my questions are answered above, if you have any influence in who (Mr Boulton) narrates your stories and if you think he does them justice and would hope for him to continue? At my age it’s nice to have some narration but, having worked in this field for a long time, I am always a little disappointed in how many stories are ruined by a poor audio accompaniment. In my humble opinion, Mr Boulton does a fantastic job and I would love him to continue but wondered what your thoughts were?

    Thank you again and wishing you every success.
    Jeb

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Hi Jeb,
      Good to hear from you.
      I am consulted by the publisher over the reader.
      Very happy with Nick.
      Best wishes
      Harry

      Reply
  20. Andreas Corcoran

    Dear Mr Sidebottom

    I’m doing a history research project for my final year of highschool on the topic of the role of historical fiction in historiography.

    The work I am looking at in particular is the Augustan Histories, and the role/significance this has in the field of Roman history despite the fact that it is mostly fiction.

    I’m interested in getting your take on this work in relation to historical fiction. I’ve also gotten halfway through Fire in the East and have to say I’m a huge fan.

    Kind regards, Andreas

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Hi Andreas,
      Sorry, I did not see your comment until just now.
      If you want to get in touch, it is best to do so via my Facebook page.
      Best wishes
      Harry

      Reply
  21. Brenda Luckhurst

    Hi Harry last year I visited an op shop with my sister. I headed for the book section and found King of Kings. I noted it wasn’t the first in the Warrior series so I went to my local bookshop and ordered the whole series. Harry ur a wonder ! Just luv Ballista and his familia. Just finished ur Throne of Caesars series and can’t wait to get my hands on the next Ballista novels.

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Hi Brenda,
      Thank you for writing; that is great to hear!
      very best wishes
      Harry

      Reply
  22. Riccardo Capretti

    Hello Mr Harry, I really appreciate your book. I already read 5 of your works and i wold like to read the amber road; but unfortunately is not possibile in italian language. Do you think that it will be possible soon.
    Thank’s for you time.
    best wishes
    Riccardo

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Hi Ricardo,
      The Amber Road will be published in Italian, as “TRIOMFO DELL`IMPERO, later in 2017.
      Best wishes
      Harry

      Reply
  23. Mike

    Dear Harry

    Just read the third in the Throne of Caesars series – a real page turner and fitting follow-on from the previous two highly enjoyable books. Thank you.

    As a teacher of History & Politics I encourage all my interested students to read these books as great examples of the power historical fiction can have in enriching a subject’s enjoyment. Do you intend to continue with this series? If not do you have any hints for your next publication/s?

    Keep writing!

    All the best

    Mike

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Dear Mike,
      Thank you very much for the kind words, and recommending my books to your students!
      One day I intend the second trilogy of Throne of the Caesars (covering the reign of Gordian III).
      My next novel is “The Last Hour” (to be published in March 2018); a new Ballists story.
      Very best
      Harry

      Reply
  24. Neil

    Hello Harry,

    I’d like to ask as to how do you prepare for writing such big stories? What events, what sources do you look at as a historian and how do you translate them onto the novel in your own words?

    How do you plan your characters, what is your entire writing process? Do you go to the University Libary and take the Cambridge Ancient History of Rome series or something? I’m more inclined into the 1st and 2nd centuries as I feel there’s more stories that could also be told. How do you use the historical research?

    I’ve seen so many ‘get rich and get published guides’ or ‘ten powerful questions to ask your characters,”. Obviously as a writer you have more access to historical sources than this. Do you look to small guides like this, or how do you write characters etc?

    How did you become good at writing that you got published? Did you read through guides such as ”How to tell a story, etc, 500 ways to writer harder?”, because in your time well around the 1970s-1990s and 2000s, the era of publishing was much different then. Nowadays its hard to become a writer because you have to do so many things in order to make your reader like it. How do you even master the first page?

    Can you be published in multiple genres? Like fantasy/historical fiction?

    Just a bunch of questions I was considering to ask from the best historical fiction writer?

    Thanks

    Neil

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Neil hi,
      I read ALL the primary sources, and a lot of modern scholarship, on the area before plotting each novel; just as I would if writing a history book.
      No, I have never read any `guide to writing a bestseller` books. Think you learn to be a writer by reading other people, then trying to write lots of different things.
      Very best
      Harry

      Reply
  25. Sean

    Dear Harry,

    I have all your novels on ancient rome and can not praise you enough to my friends and family. My father and I loved the Warrior of rome novels and can not wait for the next, but I come here to praise you for the Throne Of Ceasers novels. Your wirte in a way that mirrors the style of Fire and Ice by George R. R Martin but transcends its with fast paced, action packed intrigue. The battles are sweeping, the character building is second to none and the time period could not be more perfect.

    I do have two questions.
    Will we ever see any novels that will feature a certain Restitutor Orbis in more then a Cameo?
    Have you ever read Eagle in the Snow by Wallace Breem. If not I would highly siggest it, while its historic value is not as stromg its story is one of my personal favorites.
    Thank you for your writing and best wishes!

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Sean,
      Thank you very much for the kind words!
      Yes, I do have a plan for a novel called “Palmyra”, which will focus on that character.
      And, yes, I loved Eagle in the Snow when I read it as a lad!
      Very best
      Harry

      Reply
  26. Tony Kitchen

    Dear Harry,
    Really pleased to see that a seventh Warrior of Rome series book is imminent. Currently reading the first six books yet again, so this will be a timely addition (I am already up to Wolves of the North). Nice touch also with the Iron and Rust series; going back to before Fire in the East and gradually bringing in Ballista as the story unfolds. Ordering my copy of the seventh book first thing tomorrow. Without a doubt, yours are the best Roman era historical fiction books I have read. Looking forward to another good read. Many thanks.
    Best regards,
    Tony Kitchen

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Dear Tony,
      Thank you very much for those kind words. I do hope you enjoy The Last Hour. I enjoyed writing it as much as any novel of mine.
      best wishes
      Harry

      Reply
  27. Mel Parry

    Dear Harry
    Just read The Last Hour, and as usual up to your brilliant standard. Cannot wait for the next book.

    Your books are informative, interesting and always keep you wanting more.

    Kind Regards

    Mel Parry

    Reply
    • Harry Sidebottom

      Dear Mel,

      Thanks for getting in touch. Really pleased that you enjoyed The Last Hour. I am hard at work on the follow up.

      Best wishes

      Harry

      Reply
  28. Barry Sander

    Dear Mr. Sidebottom, thank you for writing books that take place in ancient times. Do you plan on continuing Ballista’s journey? The Amber Road left many questions about Ballista, his family, where he stands with Gallienus. If possible could you bring a close to Ballista’s story. Thank you for all the books you’ve written.

    Reply
  29. James Langley

    Hi loved all the books felt the last hour was missing something though. Anyway onto my question is there going to be an 8th book need to know if he discovers his other son ane i must know if he catches up with wulftans killer to which i was disappointed that wulfstan died i had an image of him being the next Ballista or Maximus goinh to war alongside ballistas sons.

    Reply

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